Feeds

HMRC snatches back £200m in Aspire outsource rejig

Revised deal gives taxman more 'control'

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

HM Revenue and Customs will save more than £200m by 2017 after renegotiating its Aspire outsourcing contract with Capgemini, according to Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude.

The Aspire deal covers IT services including desktops, laptops and a number of tax and credit systems such as online VAT filing. The contract, which is led by Capgemini and includes some 360 other suppliers, was renegotiated in January.

As well as lowering the cost per unit of IT services, the renegotiations will give HMRC greater control over the volume of work going through Aspire, according to the Cabinet Office. The department will also be able to control the Aspire subcontractors directly – previously the responsibility of Capgemini.

"The negotiations have also given Capgemini the opportunity to adapt its services and delivery model to align much more closely with the government's ICT strategy and its drive for a more competitive IT market place," the Cabinet Office said.

"No longer do we have a unique SI relationship with Aspire and Capgemini," HMRC CIO Phil Pavitt told the all-party Parliamentary group on outsourcing and shared services today. "We have introduced competition at all levels. There's no longer exclusivity between us and our partners."

The original Aspire – Acquiring Strategic Partners for the Inland Revenue – contract was signed by the Inland Revenue in 2004. It was agreed for 10 years and was worth nearly £3bn. The deal has been regularly revised and extended since then, including revisions in 2008 and 2009.

HMRC's spending through Aspire has fallen in recent years: it decreased from £765m in 2009-10 to £721m in 2010-11.

HMRC has reduced its spending on IT from £1.4bn to £700m in two years, according to Pavitt.

This article was originally published at Guardian Government Computing.

Guardian Government Computing is a business division of Guardian Professional, and covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
In the next four weeks, 100 people will decide the future of the web
While America tucks into Thanksgiving turkey, the world will be taking over the net
Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data
European corps can't afford to get complacent while American Big Biz battles Uncle Sam
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.