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NHS trusts beg IT suppliers to manage eHospital plan

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Cambridge University Hospitals NHS foundation trust and Papworth Hospital NHS foundation trust are seeking suppliers to provide project management and IT consultancy services for the pair's eHospital programme.

The programme, which aims to provide clinicians at the trusts with access to a single source of patient information, was sparked by the planned future relocation of Papworth Hospital to the Cambridge Biomedical Campus and the expiry of licences for hospital information systems at the Cambridge trust in 2014.

The two-year contract will include moving the trusts from an in-house technical infrastructure, including networks, servers, desktop and other access devices and service desk, to a fully-managed service, according to a notice in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU).

The deal will also deliver new administrative and clinical applications across both trusts, along with support services to underpin them.

The trusts will need to use up to 10 external individuals to support the trusts' own clinical and non-clinical staff, who will be seconded to the eHospital project for between six months and two years. The external team is expected to include two programme directors, a technical architect, a design authority team leader, an applications team leader, a programme office manager and two benefits and business change leads.

A spokesman for the Cambridge University Hospitals told Guardian Government Computing: "The OJEU advertisement is for short-term external project management and business change expertise to help the hospitals implement eHospital.

"The move to a form of contract that delivers infrastructure as a service is seen as enabling the trusts to take advantage of modern technology without expensive capital investment in hardware. The trusts will retain a core IT function using the intelligent client model."

This article was originally published at Guardian Government Computing.

Guardian Government Computing is a business division of Guardian Professional, and covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

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