Feeds

Flintstones was (sort of) true: Mammals did well alongside dinosaurs

Fred and Barney would have been proto-mice not men, though

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Everyone knows that The Flintstones was wrong: not only did humans and dinosaurs not exist at the same time, even our earliest mammalian ancestors had barely come upon the world stage at the time when the great lizards departed it.

Not so, says paleontologist Gregory Wilson. He and his fellow bone-botherers have been probing the history of a group of proto-mammals called the multituberculates, and it seems that in fact these little chaps were already well on the road to furry live-birth dominance while the dinos were still very much on top.

Wilson and his fellow boffins worked this out, essentially, by analysing the bumpiness of the primitive, diminutive Barney Rubbles and Fred Flintstones' teeth. It seems that bumpier teeth are an indicator of herbivorous diet: the smoother gnasher is generally to be found on a meat-eater creature.

Using this crafty chomp analysis, the paleontologists were able to work out that the cunning multituberculates exploited a change in plant life to gain themselves a rich new source of food just a few million years before the dinos vanished. The early mammalians were feasting happily on new species of just-evolved flowering plants, having in many cases switched from a carnivorous life scoffing insects and small creatures and the like, when the great series of extinctions which saw off the dinosaurs swept the world.

It's generally thought that these may have been triggered by the upset following a massive asteroid strike, but whatever the cause it didn't affect the new trees, herbaceous plants and so forth which our small ancestors had switched to feeding upon. Thus the mammals were already gaining size and numbers, and stood poised already to conquer the planet as the cumbersome monstro-lizards made their exit.

So, while the Flintstones is still wrong, the new research indicates that it isn't quite as wrong as had been supposed.

You can read all about it courtesy of hefty boffinry mag Nature: or there's a layman's digest available from rival publication Science. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Our LOHAN spaceplane ballocket Kickstarter climbs through £8000
Through 25 per cent but more is needed: Get your UNIQUE rewards!
LOHAN tunes into ultra long range radio
And verily, Vultures shall speak status unto distant receivers
EOS, Lockheed to track space junk from Oz
WA facility gets laser-eyes out of the fog
Volcanic eruption in Iceland triggers CODE RED aviation warning
Lava-spitting Bárðarbunga prompts action from Met Office
NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away
Interplanetary admins will back up data and get to work
Major cyber attack hits Norwegian oil industry
Statoil, the gas giant behind the Scandie social miracle, targeted
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?