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LSI thrusts PCIe flash kit even harder

Warp drive standing by, captain

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LSI will soon launch third-generation PCIe flash products, which are expected to be faster and hold more data than its existing WarpDrive.

The WarpDrive is a second source for EMC's VFCache product; Micron is EMC's primary SSD supplier for that product. The WarpDrive SLP-300 comes in 100GB, 200GB and 300GB capacity points and does 150,000 random read IOPS, 190,000 random writes and 1.4GB/sec sequential I/O.

But it is outclassed by Micron's P320h PCIe SSD, which comes in 150GB or 300GB variants and does over 700,000 random read IOPS, nearly 300,000 random writes and 3GB/sec sequential data reads.

At an analyst's webcast, reported by Stifel Nicolaus researcher Aaron Rakers, LSI said it expects to announce new (third generation) PCIe offerings imminently, and that they would will contribute to revenue in 2012.

We reckon it will catch up with Micron by accelerating WarpDrive's I/O and adding a multi-level cell version to boost capacity. It has its in-house Sandforce controller technology to help do this, and may even overtake Micron. ®

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