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Cameron denies personal Trident missile firing iPad app

UK PM will not be getting The Button onna fondleslab

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Prime Minister David Cameron has denied that he will be getting a personalised iPad app for firing Trident missiles styled after his beloved Angry Birds game.

Cameron loves to rock the fondleslab so much that he has often mentioned how he likes to sit back at Number 10, playing Angry Birds or watching TV shows like The Killing.

So naturally, getting him interested in running the country by putting governmental apps on his iPad seems like a good idea.

It's already been reported that Cameron is getting a government-overseeing app for the iPad, although other ministers may be able to use this as well. That app, costing a mere £20,000, will put the latest NHS, crime and unemployment figures at his fingertips, allow him to read Civil Service docs on the slab and, of course, pull in real-time data from Google and Twitter.

But the idea of a nuclear-missile launching app for the Prime Minister's personal use seems likely to never happen.

Labour MP Tom Blenkinson asked the PM in a written question through the Parliament what discussions he had had with the Minister for the Cabinet Office about the development of a personal iPad application for his use.

To which Cameron replied succinctly: "None."

Although it's nice to get such a tidily worded statement from a politician, since they do tend to go on a bit, the answer is a bit ambiguous.

Does he mean he's had no discussions with the Cabinet about it but the Cabinet are carrying on with it? Does he mean there is no iPad app intended for his personal use, but that other previously reported iPad app for Number 10 use allows other ministers to use it so it's not really personal use, is it, leaving him free to say "none"? Or does he mean there's no iPad app at all in the making for the running of government?

Unfortunately, Number 10 hadn't returned a request for comment at the time of publication, but should they clarify the situation to The Register, the update will be here. ®

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