Feeds

Job-seeking IT pro? Head for China

But you'll probably need to speak the lingo, recruiter warns

The essential guide to IT transformation

China’s explosive economic growth has led to a boom in job opportunities for ex-pat IT managers who fancy a new challenge, although the market remains intolerant of those without the requisite language skills or cultural know-how, according to a leading recruiter.

The newly released Salary & Employment forecast 2012 (PDF) from international job-hunter Michael Page makes for interesting reading for IT professionals with itchy feet.

It points to “consistent jobs growth for technology professionals” in banking, financial services and commercial companies as well as in the booming tech industry in China.

Senior IT managers are especially sought after for financial services and commercial entities headquartering their businesses in the economic hub of Shanghai, while opportunities for experienced tech pros are on the increase in the southern boom town of Shenzhen, home to ZTE and Huawei, among others.

The huge growth in e-commerce firms led by home-grown giants like Taobao and Dangdang is fuelling demand for product development roles while SAP and ERP app management skills are also increasingly sought after, the report found.

Michael Page managing director for north and east China, Andy Bentote, told The Reg that the opportunities for ex-pat IT pros in China are definitely growing, because “China is not creating enough quality candidates to keep up with the pace of growth of the country”.

“Traditionally we only dealt with multinationals but we’re starting to deal now with local companies as they become more international,” he added.

“They’re expanding overseas and developing their business and there’s a sweet spot there for ex-pats because they want to become more international and understand what it takes to be successful.”

However, he struck a word of caution that across the entire Michael Page International business in China, only around 5 per cent of successful candidates will be non-locals and the majority of those are in senior, managerial roles.

“It’s very hard to move over here at that level if you’re changing companies,” he warned. “If you want to move to China you might have the technical and management skills, but do you have the Chinese language skills and understand the company?”

Those who aren’t applying for a transfer or promotion internally to their firm’s Chinese outpost will therefore usually need at least some Mandarin skills and probably also have to demonstrate an understanding of what is required culturally to work in a Chinese office, he said. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.