Feeds

Proview demands 'new iPad' sales halt in China

And before Apple's even announced a launch date

Security for virtualized datacentres

Ailing monitor biz Proview has done its best to spoil the third-gen iPad party by ordering Chinese distributors to not sell the shiny new tablet due to Apple’s unresolved trademark dispute with the firm.

Proview’s Shenzhen affiliate Proview Technology sent an open letter to Chinese resellers and suppliers urging them to drop Apple’s high-definition fondleslab as its court battle is still ongoing, according to Reuters.

“Anybody who continues to do so will be seen as intentionally infringing rights and the company will adopt the most severe measures by taking legal action,” the letter read.

Apple and Proview are awaiting the outcome of Cupertino’s appeal to a Guangdong high court to overturn an earlier ruling that declared the monitor firm the rightful owner of the IPAD trademark.

Proview’s latest salvo could be seen as yet another effort to force Apple into a big money settlement, something the near-bankrupt company could certainly do with.

Perhaps because of the case, there was no mention of a Chinese sales date for the new iPad during the launch razzmatazz on Wednesday, although the shiny slab will go on sale in Hong Kong at the same time as the US and UK on 16 March and in equally nearby Macau the following week.

This raises the rather ugly prospect of another mass influx of Chinese scalpers into the Special Administrative Regions (SARs), with a mission to buy up as many iPads as they can to sell on at a profit back over the border.

Apple’s Hong Kong store has already taken steps against this, and presumably to control stock levels, by limiting the number of devices sold to two per person.

The new fondleslab sports an improved display and camera, 4G support and a new processor.

Apple had the following to say on the matter:

Whilst we have not announced a date yet for China, this is our fastest global roll out ever for iPad and we're working hard to get it into as many customers hands as possible.

The irony, of course, is that China is where Foxconn's ranked masses produce the fondleslab in the first place before it is shipped off to fanbois around the world.

Mark Natkin, managing director of China-based consultancy Marbridge Consulting told The Reg that Apple launched the iPad and iPad 2 in China several months after the US.

"Apple also recently saw things get out of control at the Beijing launch of its iPhone 4S smartphone," he added.

"Whether or not these are among Apple's key considerations in the decision to hold off on a mainland China release of the iPad 3, launching first in Hong Kong and leaving it to the market to move product inland to meet mainland China demand is probably a very prudent approach at this time." ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.