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Qantas lets fly with 'net access

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Qantas is taking The Internets to the skies with the officially launch of an in-flight A380 connectivity trial this week.

Flyers jetting between Australia and the United States will be able to access the internet and email from the air borne seats across six Qantas A380s via Wi-Fi enabled laptops and personal electronic devices, such as iPhones, iPads and BlackBerrys.

“The eight week trial will give customers the opportunity to access the Internet in exactly the same way as a terrestrial Wi-Fi hotspot in which customers can pay with their credit card and surf the Internet, including the use of email,” said Qantas Executive Manager Customer Experience Alison Webster.

The carrier has been conducting preliminary testing in recent months using Inmarsat’s SwiftBroadband and global satellite based connections and connectivity service provider OnAir.

Following the trial, Qantas said it would assess opportunities for the long-term application of internet capabilities across its A380 fleet. ®

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