Feeds

Westpac drops tech roles

Tech sector gloomy, boardroom happy

The essential guide to IT transformation

Westpac continues to slash jobs as part of its offshoring initiatives, revealing that it will cull a further 119 technology roles, most of which will be awarded to India’s Infosys.

The job cuts follow on from the recent dismantling of 188 positions in November and 560 in February. The bank is in hot water with unions and industry for the practice of bringing in lesser paid contract employees from India, training them in Australia for three to six week courses and then returning them to be employed in equivalent positions at third party companies.

Westpac said it has “an $AU8.3 million budget this year for redeployment and training as many people as possible into new roles”.

According to Human Resources magazine, the disparity in wages is stark: an equivalent Australian job positioned at $AU60,000 - $AU90,000 annually can be filled at $AU7,000 - $AU9,000 annually offshore.

The Financial Services Union (FSU) has called on the bank to respect the rights of employees impacted by job slashing announcements.

Complaints have been lodged with State and Federal Governments and politicians have begun meeting with FSU members to hear first hand the impact of job slashing and offshoring.

The union plans to hold paid time workplace meetings with affected employees to discuss the impact of the latest proposals and develop responses including alternatives to put to the bank over the next few days.

It has also called on Westpac to provide assurances that: no Westpac employee should be forced to be redundant; no-one should be forced to train the offshore provider that is replacing local jobs; jobs should not be offshored when the skills and the employees are already here doing the work well.

“It's a huge insult for the Australian workers to be told that not only are we going to take your job off you, but before we do that, we're going to require you to train an offshore replacement,” Geoff Derrick from the Financial Sector Union, said. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.