Feeds

No joke: Microsoft SQL Server 2012 debuts on April Fools' Day

Hadoop, Azure also look for more partners

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

As expected Microsoft has released SQL Server 2012, formerly codenamed Denali, to manufacturers and will be making the final code available on April Fools' Day.

"This is the cusp of a major milestone for Microsoft and SQL Server," Doug Leland, GM of SQL marketing for Redmond told The Register. "It's been battle-tested by over 150,000 customers and is ready to go."

The new build, available in standard, business intelligence and enterprise editions, has been designed specifically with big data uses in mind, and Leland reckons it works with structured and unstructured data sets faster than any previous version. The use of in-memory processing for tables was one area where significant speed increases have been achieved.

Stability has also been addressed, and one beta tester, the Home Shopping Network, saw downtime cut by a factor of 10 in testing. The PowerView data analysis tool has been added to the existing PowerPivot system and this version of SQL will also have greater support for hybrid cloud systems that mix on-premise and external databases.

Microsoft commissioned a report on upgrading to SQL Server by analyst house Forrester and this estimated that updating would pay for itself within 12 to 14 months with an estimated return on investment between 149 and 189 per cent. Redmond will hold a corporate webcast on Wednesday with more details.

Leland also confirmed that the proposed integration with Hadoop on Microsoft's Azure platform would be continuing apace, with a new beta for the system due out in the second half of the year. The company is also widening the range of companies who can try the system early, and users can sign up to take part on the Azure website.

The software will include features suggested by participants, and among the new stuff is support for the Mahout open source library for advanced predictive analytics and improved failover that should see the software become much more resilient to downtime. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.