Feeds

India splurges £100m on new mega internet snooping HQ

All tweets, emails, and status updates are belong to them

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Updated India's clampdown on its netizens is set to continue after its government revealed it is setting up a National Cyber Co-ordination Centre to monitor all web traffic flowing through the country – in the name of national security.

The Times of India had access to the minutes of a National Security Council Secretariat meeting held earlier this month, which claimed the new £100m centre would monitor all tweets, emails, email drafts, status updates and other messages.

The agency will be tasked with scanning “cyber traffic flowing at the point of entry and exit at India's international internet gateways” in order to provide “actionable alerts” to relevant government departments in the event of a perceived security threat.

If a particular online message is flagged, the centre will have the right to open it up and see if it has actually unearthed a terror plot or merely snooped on an innocent chat - so obviously no privacy issues there, then.

"The coordination centre will be the first layer of threat monitoring in the country,” deputy national security advisor Vijay Latha Reddy said during the meeting, according to the leaked paperwork. “It would always be in virtual contact with the control room of the internet service providers.”

The Indian government is now said to be working out how many people it needs to staff the new centre as well as liaison roles within each government department.

The news comes as India’s much-publicised dispute with Research In Motion took another turn last week: the BlackBerry maker agreed to set up a BBM server in the country to enable the authorities to monitor traffic running on the service more easily.

Nokia’s Push Mail service is said to be next in line, while Yahoo, Google, Skype and others are thought to be in dialogue with the government about routing their services through servers in the country to ensure all comms channels can be monitored. ®

Update

This story has been updated to correct the amount being spent on the Centre.

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Felony charges? Harsh! Alleged Anon hackers plead guilty to misdemeanours
US judge questions harsh sentence sought by prosecutors
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.