Feeds

Antimatter asymmetry: new results bring solution closer

Fermilab physicists’ fingers crossed

New hybrid storage solutions

Physicists are inching closer to explaining why we – and anything else made of matter – exist, with new results inching closer to an explanation of the universe’s matter-antimatter asymmetry.

If matter and antimatter were created in equal quantities in the Big Bang, some kind of asymmetry is needed to explain how enough matter survived to create the universe we see. The difference in matter-antimatter properties – charge-parity violation – is very easy to predict, since we exist, but it’s proven infuriatingly difficult to characterize.

The new results, announced February 29 at a meeting in La Thuile in Italy, represent a refinement of results first reported last year by CERN’s LHCb team. The CERN result found a difference of 0.8 percent in decay rates for D0 mesons and their corresponding antiparticles – but, at 3 sigma, with a high chance that the observation was a statistical fluke.

According to Science Now, Fermilab’s CDF team says its follow-up experiments (paper here) come up with a slightly lower CP violation of 0.6 percent. The result on its own has only 2.7 sigma statistical significance, but when combined with the LHCb results, they say CP violation can now be pinned down to a 3.8 sigma. At around 1:10,000 chance that this is a statistical fluke, it is less than the 5 sigma (one in a million chance of being wrong) required to announce a discovery, but it’s still a strong indication that the experiments are heading in the right direction.

The new experiment finds CP-violating asymmetries in “charmless B0, Bs0 and Λb0 decays into pairs of charged hadrons reconstructed in CDF data.”

Their data also reports direct CP violation in bottom strange mesons and bottom baryons, along with evidence for CP violation in other decays.

If the measurements are right, the next challenge will be fitting the results into standard model physics, which predicts a much lower level of CP violation. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS
Weighed several adult elephants, contend boffins
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Chelyabinsk-sized SURPRISE asteroid to skim Earth, satnav birds
Space rock appears out of nowhere, buzzes planet on Sunday
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
'Duck face' selfie in SPAAAACE: Rosetta's snap with bird comet
Probe prepares to make first landing on fast-moving rock
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.