Feeds

Apple wins battle in Motorola patent war

iPhone, iPad blocker unblocked, rules German court

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

A German court has ruled that Motorola Mobility can't enforce a patent-battle injunction it won in December that would have prevented Apple's iPhone and iPad from being sold in that country.

The injunction caused Apple to remove those products from its German online store earlier this month, only to put them back up within hours, after the courts issued a temporary suspension of that injunction.

Monday's ruling in an appeals court, in Karlsruhe, Germany, as reported by Bloomberg, goes a step further, saying that Motorola can't enforce the injunction while the case is under appeal – which may take a year or more.

At issue is a patent related to general packet radio services (GPRS) that's at the core to the development of 3G technology – so essential, in fact that the patent is legally defined as being a "standard essential patent", subject to FRAND (Fair, Reasonable and Non-Discriminatory) licensing conditions. Motorola must license it at reasonable terms to competitors – not to do so would violate antitrust laws.

"At the current state of the proceedings, it is to be assumed that Motorola Mobility would violate its duties under antitrust rules if it continues to ask Apple to stop the sales," Bloomberg reports that the Karlsruhe court said in a statement.

And so now Apple can continue to sell its iWares in Germany during the appeal, and also attempt to reach a FRAND licensing settlement with Motorola without the pressure of lost sales.

Do note, however, that this is just one patent dogfight in which Apple is contesting with the handset maker for which Google began acquisition proceedings last August. Another spat has led to Apple having to turn off iCloud push notifications, and that case is wholly separate and still in dispute.

While all this may seem a wee bit confusing, one thing is clear: if Google had planned to use its $12.5bn Motorola Mobility acquisition primarily to wield a big ol' patent stick, that cudgel just became a bit flaccid. ®

Business security measures using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s
The iKing thinks telly is far too fiddly and ugly – basically, iTunes
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.