Feeds

Apple fanbois forced to go on the pull by Motorola patent

Germans won't get the message after iOS court defeat

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Apple has switched off push notifications in Germany, responding to Motorola Mobility's successful patent lawsuit, so iCloud users in Germany will have to learn to pull together.

The outage also affects MobileMe, but anyone using ActiveSync or other push mechanisms will be fine as the companies behind those aren't being sued by Motorola Mobility. iCloud and MobileMe users will have to switch to periodic polling while Apple appeals the decision, and the mobile industry's patent war spills into the pockets of ordinary users.

Apple Germany has posted a guide for locals and visitors, explaining how to set up both iCloud and MobileMe to pull data instead of waiting for it to get pushed, and reminding visitors that they'll have to reactivate pushed services when they get home.

This isn't, apparently, the first time a patent spat has meddled with what's already in our palms - it's just a particularly obvious one. Patent court lurker Florian Mueller cites a handful of changes to the Android experience he attributes to patent cases - from the disappearance of a bouncing scroll bar to clumsy photograph browsing and the much-discussed slide-to-unlock widget vanishing from Motorola handsets (though outside Germany Motorola handsets can still be unlocked that way).

These interface patents are unrelated to those essential to the telephony standards, which come with FRAND (Fair, Reasonable and Non-Discriminatory) obligations. Apple has complained to the EC about Motorola Mobility's behaviour regarding those patents, claiming that it was never given a fair shot at a licence, but interface elements aren't essential to telephony so fall outside that complaint.

Motorola Mobility reckons it owns the idea of pushed notifications just as much as Apple owns slide-to-unlock, and if it indeed does then Apple has no right to push stuff around without a licence.

In his blog on the subject Mueller reminds us that German courts refuse to discuss the validity of patents during infringement hearings. The court has to decide if the patent is being infringed, not if it is a valid patent, and in this case Apple has been found to be infringing.

Apple still has the right to appeal, and will, but Motorola Mobility has the right to demand enforcement while the appeal is progressing, which is why Germans relying on Apple to keep them updated will need to learn to do some smart pulling. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.