Feeds

Telcos, mobile pushers muck in to trial 'clever' Wi-Fi

Hotspot 2.0: We don't need no skeenkin' logon

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Fourteen of the largest telecommunications companies around the world have participated in successful trials of Hotspot 2.0, which made it easier for them to use Wi-Fi.

During the trials, users received devices which can automatically attach to Wi-Fi when its available, and present credentials without having to bother the user for a password. But the real interest is from network operators, who get to use Hotspot 2.0 as though it were a cellular base station while also preventing those who haven't paid from latching on to it.

The trials, which were coordinated by the Wireless Broadband Alliance, included testing by AT&T, DOCOMO, China Mobile and BT, among others. Mobile kit vendors, including LG and Intel, also proved their devices were compatible with the Next Generation Hotspots (NGHs, apparently).

But it's not just hotspots and devices that one needs. Three clearing houses (Aicent, BSG & TNS) got involved to verify the credentials, and network vendors including Cisco, Aruba and Ruckus demonstrated interoperability.

Devices connecting to an NGH can use the cellular SIM, or other secure element, or even credentials stored on a hard drive, to automatically log on to a hotspot when it's nearby, so users don't have to manually connect and airports can be stripped of the brightly-coloured service marks which so consistently remind one how great connectivity would be if only one had signed up with a different provider.

Companies such as Devicescape can already bodge that kind of connectivity, using specially-formatted DNS queries to retrieve logon credentials, but an industry standard is obviously preferable. The process isn't technically difficult, but getting a standard working requires lots of integration, which is why the trials have been so critical.

The Wireless Broadband Alliance reckons that means commercial deployments later this year. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.