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Woman spanked for dissing ex in Facebook snapshot

Spanish court objects to obscene t-shirt slogan

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A Spanish divorcée's purse is somewhat lighter after she posted photos on Facebook of herself wearing a t-shirt declaring "My ex-husband's an arsehole" - and was ordered to pay €1,000 damages for her trouble.

According to local news reports, the 40-year-old slapped up the snaps in 2010. In December of that year, her former other half – they divorced in 2005 – spotted the offending images and filed suit for "dignitary tort".

The Provincial Court of Madrid agreed that the phrase "Mi exmarido es gilipollas" was indeed an affront to the chap's dignity and ordered the defendant to pay her ex €2,000 (1,694), and a €240 (£203) fine. These were reduced on appeal to €1,000 (£847) damages and eight days' house arrest in lieu of the fine.

The judge ruled that "the word gilipollas is indeed an attack on the victim's dignity and damages his reputation".

The cash-strapped loser earns just €700 (£593) a month, and has asked if she can pay the damages in installments. She said of the judgment: "I started crying because I couldn't believe it. I don't understand how the complaint could have ended in court. It's only a t-shirt."

As regards just where the very expensive comedy t-shirt came from, this report says it was the woman's current partner who bought it for her, as a "joke" present when they were on holiday on Spain's Mediterranean coast back in 2009. ®

Bootnote

The word gilipollas is a top-notch Spanish insult. It doesn't have an exact translation in English, but conveys the sense of an obnoxious arsehole with an added touch of "self-aware" stupidity in the gilipollas in question.

Commentards: En garde!

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