Feeds

Everything Everywhere pushes towards 4G, wants to show off its wad

HSPA+ in six months, LTE by year-end

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Everything Everywhere is planning to deploy 4G into the UK by the end of 2012, but mostly just to remind everyone how much it is investing in UK infrastructure.

The switch to HSPA+, which will see those nearest the transmitters doubling their 3G connection speeds, will happen in the next six months or so, and, if Ofcom will let it, then EE will start deploying 4G (LTE) technology into the 1800MHz band it already owns by the end of the year, in Bristol at least.

It probably won't be the first LTE service launched in the UK, but it will likely be the first one to offer mobility and the first from a cellular operator. Although competitors will point out that EE can do this thanks to its huge spectrum holdings – a portfolio so large than that it is being forced to sell of at least 30MHz of it just to avoid unfair market dominance.

That auction is one of the reasons EE is so keen to tell us about its spending – apparently it is investing £1.4m every day on improving its network infrastructure. It's keen to highlight that, as the operator is under fire over its plans to make something in the region of £400m selling off that 30MHz of spectrum which was allocated to it back in the days when one didn't buy frequencies.

So France Telecom and Deutsche Telecom – joint owners of EE – will be making money from something they were given by the UK government.

But if EE can show it is spending that money improving UK infrastructure then it undermines the outrage one might feel, and gets EE into the lead for 4G deployments.

The Bristol LTE will be slotted into 1800MHz, a band which isn't being widely used for LTE. That's in contrast to the 800MHz band, which is allocated for LTE in Europe, or the 2.6GHz band which is globally recognised as LTE-friendly, but neither of those will come up for auction until the end of 2012 at best. So EE will have some challenges sourcing devices able to make use of its early deployment.

Which means using USB dongles and fixed-access points, rather than connecting handsets or embedding in tablets, but it should still be fast and that's to be appreciated – even if we're all paying for it in the end. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Mighty Blighty broadbanders beg: Let us lay cable in BT's, er, ducts
Complain to Ofcom that telco has 'effective monopoly'
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?