Feeds

OPERA grabs spanner, fixes kit, and slows down neutrinos

Ye canna break the laws of physics, it seems

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

According to a breaking report from Science, last year’s famous faster-than-light neutrino finding has been attributed to a cable fault.

The report says insiders at the OPERA collaboration have found that “a bad connection between a GPS unit and a computer may be to blame”.

The experiment last year seemed to identify neutrinos completing their trip between CERN at Geneva and Gran Sasso 60 nanoseconds too quickly. This result, apparently at odds with Einstein’t oft-confirmed Special Theory of Relativity (which sets the speed of light in a vacuum as a universal maximum), sparked excitement and skepticism around the world in equal measure.

It also set the physics section of the Arxiv open-access scientific database alight, with dozens of papers re-analysing the results or, alternatively, seeking explanations.

Back in OPERA, it seems, scientists and techs were also paying attention to more mundane matters, including the equipment used to make the measurements.

Here, if today’s report is correct, we find the very mundane explanation for the measurements: the poorly-terminated cable between the computer and GPS receiver introduced a signal delay.

After tightening the connection (in other words, El Reg would speculate, eliminating a tiny gap between the end of the fibre and the sensor to which it terminated), OPERA researchers have found that the GPS data arrived 60 nanoseconds earlier than was measured during the original experiment.

"More data will be needed to confirm this hypothesis", says the report. ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.