Feeds

Bogus Pokemon evolves into iTunes smash hit

Got to catch at least some of 'em

Boost IT visibility and business value

An obviously infringing Pokemon iOS port briefly found its way to number two in the iTunes paid app chart, in the USA, despite having nothing to do with Nintendo and garnering buckets of negative reviews.

Despite the fact that the game apparently doesn’t run at all, with the vast majority of the 1,300 reviews stating just that, the Pokemon brand was enough to make thousands of iPhone users shell out a dollar a time just in case Nintendo had decided to ditch its software-to-sell-hardware strategy.

The killer application for a Nintendo DS, if one is around seven, is Pokemon, and perhaps the ageing Mario. Without those two brands, ankle biters can be bought off with a cheapo Android tablet or an iPod Touch, but neither has the magic of Ash Ketchum and his evolving pocket monster mates, not to mention Pikachu.

One can argue that Apple should have spotted that Nintendo was unlikely to have hived off development of an iOS port of its most-valuable property to one Daniel Burford, or released a game that crashes at launch for the vast majority of users - but Apple only takes responsibility when it wishes and it can't check every IP infringement.

What's more interesting is the complete failure of the peer-review system, on which app stores such as the Android marketplace are entirely dependent. The Pokemon Yellow game had 1,300 reviews, almost universally negative, but buyers were blinded by the Pokemon brand and the knowledge that they were only risking a dollar.

But that's not all they were risking: once installed iOS applications have access to all sorts of data, as Path users have discovered, so next time an application like this bubbles to the top it might cost the buyers a lot more than a dollar. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable
Floats exam program to help IT employers lock up talent
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.