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T-Mobile clams up over Full Monty 'speed-cap' claims

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T-Mobile has rejected claims that its Full Monty tariff has a 1Mb/s speed cap, but has refused to discuss whether there is a higher limit on the plan.

The operator served up the Full Monty over two weeks ago, as a rival to Three's all-you-can-eat One Plan, but has been dogged by claims that there is a cap on the speed at which customers can gobble data.

After a number of requests for a clarification of its stance on this, the cellco finally responded to Reg Hardware with the following statement:

"We can confirm that we do not have a 1Mb/s maximum data download speed in place for The Full Monty plan – nor for any of our other pay monthly or pay as you go price plans – and we are confident that our average data speeds are as good, if not better, than anyone else in the industry."

But when asked whether speeds were capped at a higher limit, the company refused to comment, except to reiterate that there is no 1Mb/s cap.

T-Mobile's Full Monty package is the firm's first 'truly unlimited' mobile offering and was supposed to rival Three's popular The One Plan.

Three was quick to get back to Reg Hardware with a promise that there is no speed-cap whatsoever on its eat-all-you-can plan.

We asked Ofcom if there are any requirements for a network operator to disclose such information.

Ofcom did not believe there was a legal obligation on telcos to tell you - even if you ask - whether or not there is a speed-cap in place on your smartphone data rates.

Last year telcos pledged to provide better and more easily comparable information to consumers about traffic management, which doesn't seem to square with T-Mobile's silence on speed caps.

T-Mobile UK's owner, Everything Everywhere, signed up to the voluntary code of practice on traffic management transparency in March 2011.

This applies to broadband throttling, but arguably the promise to be more transparent should apply to mobile data too - traffic is still being managed, after all.

Ofcom says it hopes T-Mobile keeps true to its word. Reg Hardware still awaits further clarification. ®

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