Feeds

'Exploitative' Proview slammed by trademark judge ... in 2010

Court said monitor biz deliberately tried to injure Apple

The essential guide to IT transformation

Taiwanese monitor maker Proview’s refusal to honour a deal to sell Apple the IPAD trademark in China smacks of a conspiracy driven by greed, according to a Hong Kong judge who ruled in Apple’s favour back in 2010.

The Hong Kong High Court documents from back then, published by All Things Digital, reveal that Judge Hon Poon had severe misgivings about Proview’s business dealings.

The crux of the monitor firm’s argument is that although Apple struck a deal with its Taiwanese affiliate, Proview Electronics, for the trademark rights, the affiliate is a legally separate entity to Proview Shenzhen, which owns the same trademark for the People’s Republic.

The Hong Kong judge agreed with Apple and its trademark purchaser IP Application that Proview had breached the original agreement, reserving particular ire for Proview boss Yang Rongshan who apparently knew exactly what was going on.

Here, the conduct of all the defendants demonstrates that they have combined together with the common intention of injuring Apple and IP Application by acting in breach of the agreement. Proview Holdings, Proview Electronics and Proview Shenzhen, all clearly under Yang’s control, have refused to take any steps to ensure compliance with the agreement so that the China trademarks are properly assigned or transferred to IP Application. Instead, they attempted to exploit the situation as a business opportunity for the Proview Group by seeking an amount of $10,000,000 from Apple.

The court documents certainly give weight to the view of Yang and his companies as washed up and looking to squeeze every last drop out of Apple. The firm actually went bankrupt in 2010 just months before the Hong Kong case was heard, and will be delisted from the Hong Kong Stock Exchange if it doesn’t provide a “viable resumption proposal” by June.

As if that wasn’t enough, pictures emerged this week depicting Proview’s Shenzhen offices as a heap of decaying and virtually deserted buildings that look more like the set of a bad zombie movie than the high-tech HQ of a leading monitor and LED lighting company.

That said, and apparently in contrast to its fortunes elsewhere, the firm appears to be doing rather well in facing down the might of fondleslab purveyor Apple after winning a Chinese courtroom battle over the IPAD trademark last December.

Some iPad devices have already been seized from retailers’ shelves in China and Proview has gone for the jugular in reportedly asking for imports and exports from the country be stopped.

Such a move would halt global supply lines for Apple – given its iPad is made in China. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.