Feeds

Blighty's gov to spunk up to £2.9b on crim-stalking tech

Six-year deal touted for software and gear by Ministry of Justice

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) is looking to spend up to £2.9bn on electronic monitoring technology.

The department monitors about 25,000 people electronically at any one time, using the technology to help enforce the curfew of a individual with a community order, court bail order or released on licence.

Some 116,000 people were monitored electronically over 2010-2011 – a 9 per cent rise year on year.

With an expected increase in monitoring levels this year, the MoJ has put out a tender for related software, hardware and services. The deal, valued at between £583m and £2.9bn, is to last six years with an option to extend for a further three, according to a notice in the Official Journal of the European Union.

The deal is divided into four lots: the first is for the provision of a national electronic monitoring service in England and Wales, including the processing centre, related hardware and software and deployment of field operatives. The supplier for lot one will act as the systems integrator for the other three lots.

Lot two includes monitoring and mapping software applications; lot three involves hardware such as ankle bracelets and handheld devices capable of monitoring a subject's curfew and which areas they are excluded from; and lot four covers the provision of mobile data and voice used by the monitoring service.

The MoJ says in the notice that it may in future decide to use the PSN connectivity and services frameworks to award lot four. The frameworks are expected to be released in the coming months.

This article was originally published at Guardian Government Computing.

Guardian Government Computing is a business division of Guardian Professional, and covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
Verizon bankrolls tech news site, bans tech's biggest stories
No agenda here. Just don't ever mention Net neutrality or spying, ok?
NATO declares WAR on Google Glass, mounts attack alongside MPAA
Yes, the National Association of Theater Owners is quite upset
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.