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Motorola 'Intel inside' Android 4.0 phone spied on web

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Details of Motorola's first Android 4.0 smartphone have leaked online, with the device also the company's first handset to sport Intel's 'Medfield' Atom platform.

Motorola first Android 4.0 handset with Intel

The above images of the unnamed device were posted to PocketNow, which says Moto opted out of employing traditional Texas Instruments OMAP processors in favour of the Intel chippery.

This'll run Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich spruced up with the company's latest version of Motoblur.

Further details of the rather fugly phone are as yet unknown, other than word that the camera should offer instant-on functionality and 15fps burst capture.

Motorola said in January it had entered into a "multi-year, multi-device strategic partnership" with Intel. But Lenovo will be the first major manufacturer to offer an Atom-based smartphone. The Lenovo K800 goes on sale in Q2, in China.

The buttonless blower is expected to be unveiled at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) industry shindig later this month in Barcelona. ®

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