Feeds

Australian sports get busy with copyright special pleading

Chewing on the government's ear

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Australia’s sports administrators, usually busy trying to steal each others’ audiences, have discovered the spirit of cooperation in the face of the Optus TV Now Federal Court decision.

The prime minister has confirmed that the Australian Rugby League, Australian Football League, Cricket Australia, Tennis Australia, and the Coalition of Major Professional and Participation Sports have lobbied the government for a change to the Copyright Act.

At issue is the future value of exclusive broadcast rights – particularly sports’ ability to attract carriers willing to pay for mobile distribution – if the TV Now decision stands.

According to ABC radio, the government is seeking "urgent legal advice" regarding whether the legislation should be changed.

Last week, the Federal Court decided that the “cloud PVR”-style service from Optus did not infringe copyright, because the recordings were under the control of individuals, only used for time-shifting, and were not for distribution “to the public”.

Most immediately, the decision puts the value of Telstra’s $AU153 million deal to offer AFL (for non-Australians, “Aussie Rules”) matches over its mobile network in doubt. The ARL believes the decision puts at risk its next round of TV broadcast negotiations, with its current deals due to expire at the end of 2012.

Opposition leader-in-waiting communications spokesman Malcolm Turnbull told a press conference today that the government should amend the Copyright Act without waiting for the outcome of the sports codes’ appeal to the High Court.

Readers can watch ARL chief David Gallup’s interview with Peter Wilkins of the ABC’s Grandstand program here. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Edward Snowden on his Putin TV appearance: 'Why all the criticism?'
Denies Q&A cameo was meant to slam US, big-up Russia
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Judge halts spread of zombie Nortel patents to Texas in Google trial
Epic Rockstar patent war to be waged in California
German space centre endures cyber attack
Chinese code retrieved but NSA hack not ruled out
APPLE FAILS to ditch class action suit over ebook PRICE-FIX fiasco
Do not pass go, do cough (up to) $840m in damages
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.