Feeds

NFC leader Inside Secure to IPO this month

It's no Facebook, but it does actually design stuff

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Inside Secure has filed for an initial public offering, looking to raise almost €80m a day after it celebrated shipping 20 million chips, and signed up a major handset manufacturer.

The filing is with the NYSE Euronext Paris, and Le Figaro reports that it will involve raising up to €79.3m in order to pay for more research and development, and perhaps an acquisition or two, as the NFC market becomes an increasingly polarised duopoly – which hasn't always been to Inside Secure's advantage.

The other half of the duopoly is NXP, NXP provides the NFC chips and associated secure element for the Nexus S as well as for Nokia's NFC-enabled handsets. Inside Secure gets its secure elements from Infineon, and provides designs for RIM and Sonim, among others.

Both Inside Secure and NXP have NFC APIs they're trying to foster as industry standards, starting with Android implementations, and both claim their own standard is more standard than their rival's standard, but the industry has yet to settle.

Inside Secure's big customer has been RIM, which is probably responsible for the majority of those 20 million shipped chips, but one wouldn't want an IPO hooked up to the future performance of RIM, so Inside has announced another "major handset-maker" is on board, although it won't say which.

It is saying that the unnamed manufacturer will be using "one of the most widely used mobile operating systems under license", which must surely be Android as Windows Phone can't be described as "widely used" and iOS is hardly "under licence". Details of the phone won't be available until the handset launches, "mid-year", so anyone buying shares will have to take it on trust.

There are other paths to riches: Intel is a licensee so should anyone decide to make phones with Intel Inside then they'll likely feature Inside Secure too, but we'd prefer to put our money on RIM making an unexpected comeback.

The Inside Secure/NXP duopoly is also unlikely to last long either. NFC Times reckons STMicroelectronics, Samsung, Texas Instruments and Broadcom will all have NFC chips on the market by the end of 2012, though TI's offering is apparently not aimed at smartphones.

NFC isn't the only thing Inside Secure does – the bulk of its revenue still comes from general security products including pay TV and unforgeable tags – but it's pretty clear that NFC is the future. NFC is growing fast, and now is the time to expand and grab customers before the bigger boys arrive, so Inside Secure should do well in that regard, despite being not nearly as interesting as Facebook. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.