Feeds

'App Economy' has created 466,000 US jobs

Thanks to Apple, Google, Facebook...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Although Apple may be facing mounting criticism for outsourcing its manufacturing beyond US shores, creating 700,000 jobs in China and elsewhere, one tech-industry advocacy group claims that Apple, the Android ecosystem, Facebook, and lesser lights account for roughly 466,000 US jobs in what it calls the "App Economy".

"Nothing illustrates the job-creating power of innovation better than the App Economy," writes economist Michael Mandel in a report published on Tuesday by TechNet, a group self-described as "the preeminent bipartisan political network of CEOs and Seniors Executives that promotes the growth of technology-led innovation."

The report, "Where the Jobs Are: The App Economy", attempts to enumerate the jobs created by the "incredibly rapid rise of smartphones, tablets, and social media, and the applications – 'apps' – that run on them," a burgeoning industry that the report refers to as "perhaps the biggest economic and technological phenomenon today."

TechNet used The Conference Board's Help-Wanted OnLine database of employment want ads to create its estimate, counting jobs offered "for programmers, for user interface designers, for marketers, for managers, for support staff" in the so-called App Economy, named after a 2009 article in Businessweek.

The size of the App Economy compared with other tech-sector employment

The size of the App Economy (not counting spillovers) compared with other tech sectors

According to TechNet, the total number of jobs in the App Economy rose from exactly zero in 2007, the year that the iPhone was introduced, to 466,000 today. Jobs counted included those in "pure" app firms such as Zynga, "app-related" jobs at companies such as Electronic Arts, Amazon, and AT&T, and app "infrastructure" jobs at Google, Apple, and Facebook.

As is customary with such employment-estimation attempts, the survey also included what the study refers to as "employment spillovers to the rest of the economy." That said, the spillover multiplier of 1.5 that the study used is rather conservative when compared with those used by other such studies.

Although the study asserts that "App Economy jobs are spread around the country," it notes that a full 23.8 per cent of them are to be found in California, with a total of 14.8 per cent being in the San Franisco Bay Area, home to Silicon Valley. The next largest statewide coterie of appsters – 6.9 per cent – is in New York.

"How big can the App Economy get", the sudy concludes. "That depends in many ways on the future of wireless and social networks. If wireless and social network platforms continue to grow, then we can expect the App Economy to grow along with them." ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.