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Canon focuses on low-end with PowerShot snappers

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Canon snapped into focus today with the launch of six 16Mp A-series PowerShots to slot into its lower-end range of compact cameras.

First up is the PowerShot A810 and A1300, classic models that still run on AA batteries. The A1300 rocks up with an optical viewfinder too, an unusual rarity in this day and age. Both feature 28mm wide-angle lenses with 5x optical zooms and will hit shelves for £89 and £109 respectively.

Canon PowerShot A1300

Next up are the slimmer PowerShot A2300 and A2400 IS, which come with the same features mentioned above, but also includes 1080p video capture. The A2300 costs £119, while the A2400 IS, which throws in image stabilisation, costs £129.

Canon PowerShot A3400 IS

Last but not least, on the higher-end of the scale, there's the PowerShot A3400 IS with a 3.0in LCD touchscreen, and the A4000 IS, with an 8x zoom lens. These are being pitched at £149 and £169 respectively.

Canon A4000 IS

The latest A-series Canon PowerShots will all be available from March. ®

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