Feeds

Eight... HD camera smartphones

Sharp shooters for parties and protests

The essential guide to IT transformation

Samsung Galaxy Nexus


RH Numbers
RH Editor's Choice

The Samsung Galaxy Nexus is my number one for ease of use – everything you need at the touch of a button – there's even a Disco and Lost in Space mode. Settings are clearly placed along the right hand side and, helpfully, it also shows the quality setting that's active. It has a lovely big red button to record that even my granny could see and get to grips with.

Access to my recordings was simply plug and play, just as it should be. There is a reason this phone is popular borne out by the overall quality and clarity of the footage. Being an animator, I took an instant liking to the time-lapse function, it's this kind of added extra that really impresses me.

Samsung Galaxy Nexus Android smartphone

Reg Rating 90%
Price £500
More info Google/Samsung and Clove Technology

Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc S


RH Numbers

I am convinced that Sony just doesn't want me to shoot any video. This mode is frustrating to get to, I have to swipe a little icon at the bottom of the photo app that needs a finger the width of a toothpick to achieve. Then when I'm ready to record, I have to press the tiny and badly-located shutter button on the top of the phone. The delay in starting meant I often found myself repeatedly pressing the button just to get it going.

Once you're up-and-running, the video quality is respectable, but low light performance isn't optimum, and the on-board LED illuminiation is no help really. There were big problems with sound to the extent that it repeatedly cut out during playback, so if your mate's telling you a corker, you're in serious jeopardy of losing the punchline. The touch focus is slightly frustrating, still, the recordings are convincingly sharp and the colours are nice and warm, athough maybe a little too Tango. It's hard to knock a phone that has Party mode as an option but, overall, even though this phone looks classy, its build quality reminded me of the throw away plastic cups they give you at gigs so you won't bottle the band. ®

Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc S Android smartphone

Reg Rating 75%
Price £340
More info Sony Ericsson and Clove Technology

Thanks to Clove Technology for the loan of the review handsets.

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Just in case? Unverified 'supersize me' iPhone 6 pics in sneak leak peek
Is bigger necessarily better for the fruity firm's flagship phone?
Steve Jobs had BETTER BALLS than Atari, says Apple mouse designer
Xerox? Pff, not even in the same league as His Jobsiness
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?