Feeds

Boffins out earbuds that sound right when inserted wrong

Left is right regardless

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Researchers have devised a method of automatically adjusting a stereo signal to match whichever ears a pair of earphones are squeezed into.

At last, the days of squinting to see the tiny Ls and Rs on your phones may finally be at an end.

A group from the Igarashi Design Interfaces Project in Tokyo put a proximity sensor into one of the earbuds and - hey presto - it works out which ear it has been inserted into.

Igarashi Design Interfaces Project proximity headphones

With some nifty circuit work, the clever cans make sure the right stereo channel is sent to the correct ear regardless of how you've donned your cans, New Scientist reports.

Additionally, if one bud is removed, or passed to a friend for sharing, the headphones will spontaneously switch to mono output. This is detected when a weak current, which runs between the buds, is broken.

The team has even proposed to turn things up to 11, pausing tracks for "what did you just say?" moments, if the headphones are removed.

The concept will be presented at the Intelligent User Interface conference in Lisbon later this month. Rock on. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.