Feeds

Kinect for Windows ships with SDK 1.0

PC movement

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Microsoft started shipping Kinect for Windows hardware today alongside version 1.0 of the official Kinect for Windows SDK, expanding the company's motion-control operation from Xbox 360 gaming to desktop computing.

Specifically built for developers, the new Kinect for Windows sensor can see objects from as close as 400mm, while the SDK offers support for up to four connected Kinect sensors at once.

There's also improved skeletal tracking, with coders able to control which user is being tracked, as well as enhanced speech recognition accuracy.

Kinect for Windows

Anyone interested can pick up Kinect for Windows for $249 (£207), although the price will be reduced for educational establishments later in the year.

The Redmond firm was last month said to have been testing Asus laptops with built-in Kinect functionality. Perhaps soon we'll see the power of motion-control pitch camp in computer builds the same way webcams did. Swish. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management
How using vulnerability assessments to identify exploitable weaknesses and take corrective action can reduce the risk of hackers finding your site and attacking it.