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Microsoft builds Kinect into Asus laptops

Prototype PCs test future of UI interaction

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Microsoft and Asus have built a laptop with Kinect motion-sensing technology on board.

Two prototype machines were recently seen, but not used, by The Daily, the website says. The two notebook PCs feature extra, Kinect-oriented distance sensors built into their screen bezels alongside their regular webcams.

Microsoft is keen to get Kinect into PCs, and will be releasing software to add Kinect to Windows next month. It's also expected to offer PC-centric sensor hardware.

Do you really want motion control in a laptop though? We can't see many folk happy to sit waving their arms around, even to make small gestures for manipulating a UI, with a notebook perched precariously on their knees.

And laptop screens - even 17-inchers - are too small for the kind of gaming at a distance that the Xbox incarnation of Kinect makes possible.

Microsoft should stick to trying to get Kinect built into TVs - a more appropriate use of the motion-control tech. ®

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