Feeds

Symantec's profits up in calm third quarter

Growth in security and compliance keeps ship steady

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

CEO Enrique Salem stands crisp and smart on the poop deck of the good ship Symantec, looking back at a straight course and ahead to more growth. It's a pretty unexciting third quarter story really.

Third quarter revenues for the security, storage and server company were $1.75bn – 7 per cent up on a yearly comparison. Profits were $240m, up loads from the $132m recorded a year ago, an increase of 82 per cent actually, which must have made the generally imperturbable Salem feel like whooping with joy.

Symantec said: "Consumer segment revenue represented 31 per cent of total revenue and increased 5 per cent year-over-year on an actual and currency-adjusted basis.

"The Security and Compliance segment revenue represented 30 per cent of total revenue and increased 17 per cent year-over-year on an actual and currency-adjusted basis.

"The Storage and Server Management segment revenue represented 36 per cent of total revenue and increased 3 per cent year-over-year on an actual and currency-adjusted basis.

Services segment revenue represented 3 per cent of total revenue and decreased 13 per cent year-over-year ... as expected due to the company's move to a partner-led consulting model."

Revenues for the fourth quarter are expected to be between $1.72bn and $1.73bn, increasing 2.8 to 3.4 per cent on an annual basis. Salem is probably encouraging his storage and server business execs to get that growth rate up to consumer and security and compliance segment levels. Hmm, what can they do? Buy CommVault? Get into big data more? Provide cloud storage gateway software to stop Amazon and others stealing the data protection business from underneath their noses?

Symantec's navigators are plotting the course ahead to find good winds, safe seas and fine anchorages. The rise in governmental and corporate hacks is good news for the security software maker and indicates strong and steady growth ahead. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Shellshock: 'Larger scale attack' on its way, warn securo-bods
Not just web servers under threat - though TENS of THOUSANDS have been hit
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
PEAK IPV4? Global IPv6 traffic is growing, DDoS dying, says Akamai
First time the cache network has seen drop in use of 32-bit-wide IP addresses
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Who.is does the Harlem Shake
Blame it on LOLing XSS terroristas
Researchers tell black hats: 'YOU'RE SOOO PREDICTABLE'
Want to register that domain? We're way ahead of you.
Stunned by Shellshock Bash bug? Patch all you can – or be punished
UK data watchdog rolls up its sleeves, polishes truncheon
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.