Feeds

Telstra gets core spot in new Asian cable

Huawei set to build ASSC-1

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Telstra has signed on as a foundation customer on a nascent Perth to Singapore submarine cable system which is being built by ASSC-1 Communications Group.

The privately-held Australian cable developer was granted a telecommunications carrier licence by ACMA on 18 October 2010. The project will begin construction in the first quarter of 2012 and is expected to be completed within 2013, based on current project timelines.

As anchor tenant, Telstra will purchase one of the 4 fibre pairs from ASSC-1’s fibre optic submarine cable and will also provide landing party services in Perth.ASSC-1 will deliver a four-fibre pair cable system which will span a distance of 4,600 kilometres with an initial design capacity of 6.4 terabits per second, to be delivered through 40 gigabits per second technology, with the capability to be upgraded to 100 GBps in the future.

The ASSC-1 system will feature three express fibre pairs between Perth and Singapore, and one omnibus fibre pair between Perth, Jakarta and Singapore.

“ASSC-1 will dramatically increase the capacity for internet and data traffic between Australia, particularly the west coast, Asia and Europe, and we expect it to take up excess demand from the only existing cable on this route, which is the ageing SEAMEWE3 system. In addition we expect to provide increased diversity for traffic from Asia to the US via Australia,” said ASSC-1 CEO James Chen.

Huawei Marine Networks, which is currently very active in the trans-Tasman cable market, will supply and install the ASSC-1 system. While Matrix Cable Systems will supply the Jakarta Landing through their own cable landing station and will also work with ASSC-1 to manage the Indonesian permit process.

“The Telstra and Huawei Marine Networks agreements entered into by ASSC-1 underpin the development and significance of this new state of the art, high speed submarine fibre optic cable,” Chen said.

Telstra is also to provide the Australian landing station for the cable via its Wellington Street exchange in Perth. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s
The iKing thinks telly is far too fiddly and ugly – basically, iTunes
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.