Feeds

SharePoint gods peek into colleagues' info – poll

Security is for other people

Security for virtualized datacentres

SharePoint admins are abusing their privileged status to sneak a peak at classified documents according to a poll that shows consistent abuse of security in Microsoft's business collaboration server.

A third of IT administrators or somebody they know with admin rights have read documents hosted in Microsoft's collaboration server that they are not meant to read.

Most popular documents eyeballed were those containing the details of their fellow employees, 34 per cent, followed by salary – 23 per cent – and 30 per cent said "other."

Ironically, the poll found the jury almost split on whether the authors of documents themselves could be trusted to control the security privilege settings on their work.

IT admins are firmly in control of setting access rights within SharePoint; 69 per cent set the permission levels that say who reads what, by individual or by group.

The data comes from a Cryptzone SharePoint security survey of 100 individuals running or using SharePoint systems, which has just been released. Respondents worked for a range of companies of varying size.

The poll reveals a consistently healthy disregard for the security supposedly afforded to company documents by SharePoint. Forty-five per cent of respondents said they'd copied sensitive information to the drive of a local PC or to a USB stick; 43 per cent did it because of the need to work from home; while 55 per cent said they'd done it because the docs were needed by somebody who didn't have access to SharePoint.

Ninety-two per cent of admins said they realised their actions made the material less secure while 30 per cent said they weren't bothered because taking the information had helped them get their job done. ®

You can download a copy of the report here (warning: PDF). ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY
'Nerd release' finally staggers past 50 per cent adoption
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
Was ist das? Eine neue Suse Linux Enterprise? Ausgezeichnet!
Version 12 first major-number Suse release since 2009
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.