Feeds

ITV wrist-slapped for showing video game as IRA attack

Not fined for YouTube rip and bungled riot coverage

Security for virtualized datacentres

ITV has escaped a fine for using video game footage to illustrate IRA activities, and portraying the wrong riot, but will tighten up procedures to stop it happening again.

The offending footage was supposed to show the IRA successfully shooting down a British Army helicopter, and was captioned "IRA Film 1988", but actually came from the first-person shooter called Arma 2. ITV accepted the mistake, and said it was an error of process – similar to the one that led to the same programme illustrating the Belfast riot that occurred in July 2011 with scenes from a much earlier outbreak of civil unrest.

Here's how ITV bungled: the video game footage was thought to be an uncut version of film used in an episode of The Cook Report from 1989, and wasn't properly checked as it should have been. The riot footage was supplied by a trusted local historian, but a miscommunication resulted in the wrong footage being shipped.

The process by which video game footage ended up in a broadcast documentary is examined in detail in Ofcom's report [PDF, details start on page 7], but basically ITV had a very short scene from The Cook Report and was delighted to find something better on YouTube. The YouTube video was labelled as real, and it's easy to believe something when it says just what you'd like it to.

Arma 2

That'll cost ITV an Arma and a leg: the video game footage

ITV reckons there was "no watermark or copy protection marked on the internet footage to indicate its source as being a video game" and the failure to check was down to "the pressure [the production team] were under in meeting the deadline for the programme's completion, delivery and broadcast".

So basically they rushed things to get the programme in the can, and got caught out. This time Ofcom has let them off with a slap on the wrist and an assurance that the broadcaster will try harder in future. ®

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.