Feeds

DreamHost nightmare attack sparks passwords reset

Hackers inappropriately touched customer database

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

US-based hosting firm DreamHost is advising customers to change their passwords following a database breach.

The firm warned on late on Friday that hackers had compromised customer FTP/shell access passwords. DreamHost began the process of resetting customer passwords over the weekend, a process that hit a few hiccups along the way (if entries on its status update page are any guide). Web panel passwords, email passwords and billing data were not affected by the breach, the company said. These passwords have also been reset as a precaution.

Compromised passwords could potentially be used to change the content of hosted sites or to (more likely) insert malicious code. The motives of the hackers – much less their identity – remains unclear.

In a blog post, DreamHost chief exec Simon Anderson said the company had been hit by a "previously unknown" attack. He attempted to allay fears by saying nothing bad had happened to customers as a result of the breach, possibly because DreamHost reacted quickly once a breach was detected.

"The bad news is that we detected access to one of our databases and took rapid action to protect customer accounts and passwords," it said. "The good news is that it does not appear that any significant malicious activity has occurred on any customer accounts as a result of the illegal access.

"Early yesterday, one of DreamHost’s database servers was illegally accessed using an exploit that was not previously known or prevented by our layered security systems in place. Our intrusion detection systems alerted our Security team to the potential hack, and we rapidly identified the means of illegal access and blocked it," he added. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Attackers raid SWISS BANKS with DNS and malware bombs
'Retefe' trojan uses clever spin on old attacks to grant total control of bank accounts
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.