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American search team fails to find women's G-spot

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US researchers have concluded that there's little evidence to support the existence of the legendary Gräfenberg Spot - a bundle of nerves located in the front wall of the vagina which can supposedly cause the earth to move.

The team - led by urologist Dr Amichai Kilchevsky of Yale-New Haven Hospital - trawled "clinical trials, meeting abstracts, case reports, and review articles" published between 1950 and 2011, to identify "any valid objective data" indicating women really do have a turbo button.

The researchers' abstract - published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine - explains: "The literature cites dozens of trials that have attempted to confirm the existence of a G-spot using surveys, pathologic specimens, various imaging modalities, and biochemical markers.

"The surveys found that a majority of women believe a G-spot actually exists, although not all of the women who believed in it were able to locate it.

"Attempts to characterize vaginal innervation have shown some differences in nerve distribution across the vagina, although the findings have not proven to be universally reproducible.

"Furthermore, radiographic studies have been unable to demonstrate a unique entity, other than the clitoris, whose direct stimulation leads to vaginal orgasm."

The sobering conclusion is that there's no "strong and consistent evidence for the existence of an anatomical site that could be related to the famed G-spot".

This finding backs a previous study by a King's College London team, who argued that the G-spot "may be a figment of women's imagination, encouraged by magazines and sex therapists".

They asked 1,800 women, all of them identical or non-identical twins, if they had a G-spot, on the assumption that "if one did exist, it would be expected that both identical twins, who have the same genes, would report having one".

However, the result was that "the identical twins were no more likely to share a G-spot than non-identical twins who share only half of their genes".

Team member professor Tim Spector said: "Women may argue that having a G-spot is due to diet or exercise, but in fact it is virtually impossible to find real traits.

"This is by far the biggest study ever carried out and shows fairly conclusively that the idea of a G-spot is subjective."

That two investigations have now thrown the G-spot into doubt is unlikely to impress the French. When King's College published its findings, gynaecologist Odile Buisson insisted that the results proved nothing more than we poor Brits were incapable of finding the G-spot in the 60 per cent of women who are indeed blessed with a vaginal pleasure switch.

Surgeon Pierre Foldes chipped in with: "The King's College study shows a lack of respect for what women say. The conclusions were completely erroneous because they were based solely on genetic observations. It is clear that in female sexuality there is a variability. It cannot be reduced to a yes or no or an on or off." ®

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