Feeds

Sony Ericsson announces pre-slurp loss

Hopes things will look up after Sony takes reins

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Sony Ericsson has announced what it no doubt hopes will be one of its last quarterly losses for the end of 2011, just before it gets slurped in full by Sony.

The mobile phone maker, which has struggled to compete with big Android houses like Motorola and Samsung, is to be fully taken over by Sony in the next few months. The move should allow greater integration with Playstation and tablet devices from the Japanese firm, and thereby pimp up its smartphone offerings.

In the meantime, Sony Ericsson handsets have failed dismally to set the world on fire, making a loss of €207m in the last quarter of 2011 and a full year loss of €247m.

"Our fourth quarter results reflected intense competition, unfavourable macroeconomic conditions and the effects of a natural disaster in Thailand this quarter," CEO Bert Nordberg explained in a canned statement.

However, the first of these is clearly the biggest obstacle to be overcome, as by its own estimates, Sony Ericsson is only holding onto ten per cent of the Android smartphone market.

New and exciting things are expected from Sony when it fully takes over in February, expectations that have been fuelled by a leaked document listing new handsets for this year.

The document, allegedly a leaked sales report for India, has been widely circulated on the net and gives a list of 11 new handsets to be released throughout the year.

The prices given are in rupees and phones normally cost more in India than they do in the US, but the range gives an idea of the sorts of high- and medium-end smartphones Sony might be looking at. At the high end, the Hayabusa would be £412 in a direct UK currency conversion, while the Mint would come in at £470.

Sony has already unveiled two post-Ericsson smartphones – the Xperia Ion and the Xperia S – at the CES show in Las Vegas, and more are expected at Mobile World Congress next month. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.