Feeds

Angry Brides lob stilettos in dowry shakedown takedown

Bad boy bridegrooms battered in game against banned tradition

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Indian matchmaking service Shaadi.com has launched a new game based on the immensely popular Angry Birds that aims to highlight the unfair and illegal practice of demanding dowries in South Asian countries.

Angry Brides is hosted on Shaadi.com's Facebook pages, and features a red-clad eight-armed woman, presumably styled on the Hindu goddess Durga.

The game gets players to throw a variety of weapons at grooms with a dowry price tag of 1.5 million rupees ($29,165), knocking money off the price at each hit. Weapons include stiletto shoes, frying pans, rolling pins and broomsticks.

The money knocked off the dowry by successful hits from players is added to an Anti-Dowry Fund, which is then posted on the players' Facebook page.

The dowry was traditionally a gift from a new bride's family to her groom and his parents, meant to ensure that she could be taken care of in her new home. The practice was outlawed over 50 years ago, but still happens today and has even been twisted into a form of blackmail, where the groom and his family continue to demand money after the marriage has taken place.

When demands aren't met, the bride can be both physically and emotionally abused, or even murdered, by her husband and family.

Shaadi.com's Angry Brides game has been "Liked" by over 270,000 Facebook users. The matchmaking service said on the page that it has "always believed that marriage is an institution of love, where there is place for togetherness, mutual understanding, family values and emotional support, not for dowry".

"According to the Indian National Crime Records Bureau's 2007 statistics, India witnesses one dowry death every four hours," the page said.

"We condemn this society menace and have consistently run campaigns on social media to help create awareness on the seriousness of this issue. The Angry Brides game is our way of throwing a spotlight on the nuisance of dowry." ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s
The iKing thinks telly is far too fiddly and ugly – basically, iTunes
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.