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Sony website defacer pwned by second hacker

It's a dog-eat-dog world

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A defacer affiliated with Anonymous vandalised Sony's online front door this week over the corporate behemoth's support of SOPA, a hated anti-piracy law proposed in the US.

The Sony Picture's website was defaced and clearly unauthorised comments were posted on the media giant's Facebook page. The digital graffiti was scribbled by a hacker who uses the Twitter handle s3rver_exe. Both acts of vandalism were rapidly purged, while the YouTube video illustrating the hack was quickly pulled.

Neither cyber-assault was significant as the perp readily concedes. Even so, the latest security breach doesn't reflect well on Sony's much vaunted efforts to bolster its electronic defences following last year's PlayStation Network hack, which forced Sony to take down its gaming platform for weeks.

In an ironic twist, the Twitter account of @s3rver_exe was hacked on Friday in the wake of the #OpSony pawnage.

"Sony was hacked because the admin panel was not encrypted ROFL. And I have got my account back," s3rver_exe said. "I don't know why the hacker hacked me. I think he did it for the lulz."

"The hack wasn't big but still the servers were vulnerable and I got access to the admin too," he later added. ®

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