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Motorola goes mini with bijou blowers

Defy style

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Motorola Mobility has slimmed down its handset range, signalling the launch of two new Android 2.3 Gingerbread smartphones this spring.

First up is the Motorola Motoluxe, a device that runs on an 800MHz processor and features a 4in "edge-to-edge" touchscreen display. There's also an 8Mp rear-facing camera, a front-facing 0.3Mp webcam and a 1400mAh battery that provides, claimed Moto, 6.5 hours of talk time.

Motorola Motoluxe

As this is geared towards the style-conscious hipsters out there, Motorola is touting the Motoluxe's "lanyard slot with lighting effect", which will optically alert a user when they have a missed call, text or email. Yes, how very stylish.

Next up is the latest incarnation to the company's rugged range of Defy phones, the Motorola Defy Mini. As the name suggests, the hardened handset is a smaller version of its predecessors, running a 600MHz processor.

Motorola Defy Mini

The Defy Mini rocks up with a 3.2in touchscreen, a 3Mp rear-facing camera and a 1650mAh battery for ten hours' talk time.

Both handsets will be on show at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas next week, before Europe-wide shipping begins in February. Prices have yet to be confirmed. ®

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