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Moog goes boom with itty-bitty bass synth

Analogue sound generation

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Synth-sectarians will be swiping saliva off their chins this morning after Moog unveiled its latest analogue bass synth, the Moog Minitaur.

The Minitaur joins the Taurus family as the first sibling lacking in foot pedals. Measuring just 8.5 x 5.25in, the compact box is designed to slot into any space and be taken on the road with ease.

Moog Minitaur Analogue Bass Synthesiser

With its one-knob-per-function interface, the Minitaur provides a lot of boom for the buck, featuring two saw and square wave oscillators, the Taurus-like ladder filter and a couple of envelope generators.

It also throws in Midi controls through USB as well as various analogue inputs for pitch, gate, filter and volume.

The company warns that "speaker damage, structural damage to buildings and personal injury are all possible" using its latest synth, a disclaimer sure to get bass-heads squirming in excitement.

The Moog Minitaur Analogue Bass Synthesiser starts shipping this spring with a price tag of $679 (£437). Have a ganders at the videoclip below for a brief introduction. ®

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