Feeds

Nokia Ace to launch from $100m mountain of ad cash

Microsoft and co bet big on new WinPhone

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Microsoft and its partners will start spending money like water in the next three months, following the launch of the Nokia Ace, according to sources cited by Betanews.

The site says $100m in cash will be spent by AT&T, Microsoft and Nokia to push the Windows Phone handset into American hands in the second quarter of 2012. That might seem like a lot, but it's a fraction of the billion-dollar budget Nokia negotiated with Redmond as part of the deal to adopt Windows Phone. Nokia's money is to be spent over the next five years, so expect to see and hear the Windows Phone branding just about everywhere, and for a long while too.

Not much is known about the Nokia Ace, though it is expected to be launched around March. That would be perfect for announcing at Mobile World Congress, which this year won't provide the ideal excuse for lonely telecoms executives to avoid Valentine's Day as it has shifted to the end of Feb.

According to the latest rumours, the Ace will have a 4.3-inch screen, pushing it into the oversized end of the smartphone market, but otherwise be much like the Lumia 900. But, more importantly, Betanews reckons it will get carrier backing as a flagship device, and that AT&T will be taking some of those marketing dollars to push the handset in its stores.

This profligate ad spend is in stark contrast to Apple, which used carrier-exclusivity to get operators to pay the marketing costs for the iPhone. In exchange for regional-exclusives, Apple got to control every aspect of operators' advertising, but didn’t have to pay for it.

Sadly for Redmond, times have changed, and Microsoft plans to achieve the same thing by spending pots and pots of money. Fortunately Microsoft has pots and pots of money, and now we know when it will start spending it. The only remaining questions are how it will be spent, and, crucially, if the marketing push will work. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
YOU are the threat: True confessions of real-life sysadmins
Who will save the systems from the men and women who save the systems from you?
Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?
Speedy network claims only apply to 10% of customers
Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up
Turning it off and on again fixes glitch 12 HOURS LATER
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Ofcom snatches 700MHz off digital telly, hands it to mobile data providers
Hungry mobe'n'slab-waving Blighty swallows spectrum
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.