Feeds

Wi-Fi desk rodents break free from oppressive cabling

A mouse without wires! It's a Christmas miracle

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

A reference design for a wireless mouse has received Wi-Fi Direct certification, making it the first rodent to achieve such fame, though not, perhaps, the very first to ditch the wire.

The design comes from Ozmo, a company which has spent the last four years burning through $40m in VC cash trying to prove that Wi-Fi can do everything. The Ozmo2000 Wireless Mouse uses Wi-Fi Direct to connect to computers that support that standard, but don't have Bluetooth, assuming one can find such a beast.

Wi-Fi Direct is a peer-to-peer variant of the Wi-Fi standard, and Ozmo reckons it has shipped one million chips to companies who are embedding support into everything from Blu-Ray players to air conditioning units. Ozmo has a fair amount of intellectual property in Wi-Fi Direct, so along with Intel (who has a lot of IP in Wi-Fi) it has been pushing the standard as a direct competitor to Bluetooth.

The standard is a good deal less power hungry than its networking equivalent, comparable to Bluetooth perhaps, and Intel has managed to push it into some wireless video products so laptops can connect to TVs, but one has to wonder how often a direct peer-to-peer connection is necessary when one's TV is so often on the same LAN as one's laptop (and thus able to use DLNA).

For audio and other peripherals Wi-Fi Direct has had even less of an impact. A few sets of speakers exist, but it's notable that Amazon is listing the flagship Logitech model as "currently unavailable" (as opposed to "out of stock") while the Bluetooth variant is ready for shipping.

The Wi-Fi Alliance lists 424 devices as being Wi-Fi Direct enabled, and support from Korea is voluble with LG and Samsung being the primary cheerleaders (Samsung are responsible for the aforementioned air conditioner).

Ozmo argues that Bluetooth is unnecessary, and that consumer devices can reduce costs by supporting a single 2.4GHz radio stack. There is some truth in that: margins on a TV are much tighter than those on a computer, and it’s the incremental cost of Bluetooth which has prevented the tech replacing IR for our remote controls. But with so many solutions already available for connecting our kit together it's hard to see how Wi-Fi Direct will be able to carve itself a niche, even with the support of Intel, and a working mouse. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.