Feeds

2012 CES will be Microsoft’s last hurrah

Did it jump or was it pushed?

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Microsoft has said that Steve Ballmer’s opening keynote for the Consumer Electronic Show (CES) in January will be the last time a Redmond head takes the stage, and it won’t be having an exhibition stand at the show after 2012 either.

The move ends nearly 20 years of Microsoft’s involvement with the show, both in giving the keynote and taking out acres of floor space to show off the latest technology to come out of Seattle. In a blog post Microsoft’s corporate VP of communications Frank Shaw said that the move was down to the changing priorities of the company and the timing of the show.

We have decided that this coming January will be our last keynote presentation and booth at CES. We’ll continue to participate in CES as a great place to connect with partners and customers across the PC, phone and entertainment industries, but we won’t have a keynote or booth after this year because our product news milestones generally don’t align with the show’s January timing.

The official explanation may however be a Redmond herring. There are rumours that the Consumer Electronics Association, which runs the show, was asking for larger than usual “donation” from companies looking to give a keynote and Microsoft may have baulked at the cost.

Bill Gates first took to the CES stage in 1994 to show off the forthcoming Windows 95, and quickly made the keynote his own, for both good and bad reasons. His talks were eagerly anticipated, not just for the content but also for the chance of watching new technology fail on stage.

Steve Ballmer carried on the tradition, although in El Reg’s opinion he was lacklustre at best – using the keynote as a sales pitch rather than leavening the mix with interesting stuff people might actually want to hear. Last year’s performance was a particular low point, with very little news and products shown off that never made it to market. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.