Feeds

NEC ramps up regional broadband wholesale

Celebrates completion of regional backhaul

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

With the last link of Australia’s Regional Backhaul Blackspots Program (RBBP) network – from Darwin in the Northern Territory to Toowoomba in Queensland – going live, NEC has announced an expansion of its regional wholesale broadband footprint.

Backhaul has long been a bottleneck in broadband outside metropolitan Australia, with providers reluctant to install DSLAMs in towns served only by Telstra long-haul fibre. Under the RBBP program, fibre outfit Nextgen has been contracted to build and operate a backhaul network covering regional locations in all mainland states.

NEC is taking advantage of the new network, announcing that it will be installing DSLAMs most of the way along the Darwin-Toowoomba link.

According to Richard McCarthy, assistant general manager of NEC’s broadband division Nextep, the arrival of competitive backhaul in RBBP locations has a huge impact on the financial viability of service provision.

In regional areas, he told The Register, “low backhaul [cost] will allow retailers to compete with healthy margins, with prices in the region of 10 to 30 percent below the current lowest residential price”.

“Wholesale prices will be very similar to metropolitan prices,” he said, “which will enable retailers to acquire customers from the incumbent, and also acquire new customers who were disadvantaged do to a lack of competition.”

NEC says it has selected communities based on the expected customer demand, rather than simply the size of the community. Many remote communities in Australia maintain low resident populations, but because of mining activity can generate a greater demand for business services than might be implied by their size.

The company says it will be installing DSLAMs in the towns and cities of Barcaldine, Chinchilla, Dalby, Longreach, Oakey, Noonamah, Palmerston, Darwin, Tennant Creek, Katherine, Howards Springs, Berrimah, Casuarina, Nightcliff, Emerald, Blackwater, Roma, Mount Isa and Cloncurry. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.