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Bah, humbug! Virgin Media censors Charles D**kens

EPG in ginormous Hitchc**k-up!

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Some Virgin Media telly customers attempting to tune in to various programmes over the weekend were greeted with ludicrous censoring of well-known names, such as Charles D**kens and Jarvis C**ker.

The cockup was reported by The Media Blog, which posted various screenshots sent in by bemused viewers using Virgin Media TV's on-screen telly guide.

Football team Arsenal was also censored as was film director and psycho thriller king Alfred Hitchcock.

"Over the weekend a temporarily over-zealous profanity checker took offence at certain programme titles. The altered titles have been swiftly analysed and we're fixing any remaining glitches," the company told The Register in a statement.

Virgin Media had earlier given the same response to the FT's Tim Bradshaw, though on that occasion the telco jokingly censored the word "an*lysed".

Strangely, it didn't extend the same humourous statement to Vulture Central, which prompted us to ask if the whole thing was a PR stunt.

"No," was the one-word response from a V**gin Media spokesman. ®

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