Feeds

Google+ gets group vid, Nokia still has a Pulse

Social networks for people who don't like people

Top three mobile application threats

Google+ is adding group video to its hangouts on Android, while Nokia Pulse gets updated for those who like their social networking a little less social.

Both networks are very mobile-orientated, but Nokia Pulse is primarily about geotagging content for sharing with groups of cloud-based friends while Google+ has bigger fish to fry. The latest Android client for Google+ enhances its real-time nature - and levers the rest of the Google portfolio - with video-enabled Hangouts getting archived to one's private YouTube channel as shown by this particularly-sickening video.

Using Google+ is a bit like visiting a theme park in the rain, during the school term, but at least there's some life - Nokia Pulse echoes with an almost post-apocalyptic emptiness. If you're a Windows Phone user then it still might be more attractive than the heavily-Android focused Google+, though Android-toting friends will be limited to the web-based version for the moment and, to be fair, it still claims to be in beta.

The Google+ Android client is now available in the UK, and very pretty it is too though the promised video hangouts aren't yet in evidence (the updated version is expected in the next few days).

Real-time hangouts are a key differentiator for Google+, while Facebook continues to ape Twitter's live text streams and Twitter keeps lifting features from its Chinese contemporaries. Competition is certainly driving social networks to innovate, and mobility is the focus - even the most proactive of users seem unwilling, or unable, to maintain more than two or three online identities.

Those identities are largely with Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter today, so in order to attract users Google and Nokia need a killer feature to get them to drop one of their existing networks. For Google+ that's hangouts with videos, for Nokia Pulse it's Windows Phone integration, but getting users to switch networks will be a tough job indeed.

Seven Steps to Software Security

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.