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LG to tune in TVs to Intel's WiDi

First tellies with laptop streaming tech on board

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Intel has won LG's backing for its Wireless Display (WiDi) video-over-Wi-Fi initiative.

The South Korean giant will add the tech to next year's Cinema 3D TVs, it said today. They'll be the first tellies to have WiDi built in.

WiDi, which streams video content from an Intel-based laptop, on a point-to-point basis if there's no WLAN present, currently requires a receiver box that connects to one of a TV's video inputs. Boxes are made by the likes of Netgear and Belkin.

But WiDi, which was launched in 2010, has failed to take off in any appreciable way. The problem: because it's an Intel technology, the chip giant has tied WiDi to closely to its silicon.

To stream video from your laptop, your machine not only needs an Intel CPU with Intel graphics on board but also an Intel wireless card. Quite a few modern notebook use other companies' Wi-Fi cards.

LG said it will demo its WiDi tellies at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January 2012. ®

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