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Facebook won't deny it is sitting on huge mountain of cash

Mole says Zuck still owns a quarter of it

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Facebook has declined to comment on a report that suggested the dominant social network had already tucked away sales of $2.5bn for the first nine months of 2011.

Gawker, citing a "well-placed" source, claimed to have its hands on juicy financial details about the privately-held company that is expected to go public next year.

A Facebook spokeswoman told The Register "No comment, as it relates to revenue."

If the numbers are accurate, then they paint a good picture of just how much money CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg is sitting on right about now.

Here's Gawker's breakdown for the period covering January 2011 to September 2011:

Assets: $5.6 billion
Cash/cash equivalents: $3.5bn
Debt: $0
Shareholder equity: $4.5bn
Operating cashflow: $1bn
Revenue: $2.5bn
Operating income: $1.2bn
Net income: $714m

The same report echoed earlier suggestions that Facebook was looking to raise $10bn at a $100bn valuation in an initial public offering.

That private treasure trove, again if correct, is impressive. But some observers had estimated that Facebook could hit revenue of $4bn for 2011, a goal that may have now been missed, unless - that is - the company manages to pull in sales of $1.5bn during its final quarter.

Another interesting nugget apparently leaked by the anonymous source to Gawker appears to reveal exactly how Facebook's ownership is currently carved up.

Zuckerberg owns 24 per cent of the network he helped build from his college dorm in Harvard.

Among others, Facebook employees have a 30 per cent slice of the pie, serial Web2.0 investor Digital Sky Technologies owns 10 per cent, and Microsoft has 1.3 per cent ownership of the network.

Earlier today, the company debuted a major makeover of Facebook by introducing its Timeline feature. The network certainly appears to be priming itself for a very public showtime in 2012. ®

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